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If you have gone past or into the Memorial Building during the past several months, you have seen evidence of the upgrades happening there. This fine Art Deco-style building always receives compliments from visitors. Peter Hyduke, Director of City Services, and the entire staff of the Memori…

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When people enjoy Carey Lake — the cross country skiing in winter, or the fishing and swimming in the summer — they might not know the interesting history there. Maybe they hear some people refer to the area as “DuPont” and not know why. There might even be an old-timer who mentions that the…

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It’s always a joy to find stories written by people about everyday events. That’s not to say that stories about big, once-in-a-lifetime events such as landing on the moon or winning an election aren’t terrific too, but there is something about ordinary people’s lives that inspires.

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Here are a number of articles that appeared in the Hibbing Daily Tribune over a variety of years. How people celebrated the holidays in past years is interesting to read about. Some things change and some things remain the same.

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When it gets to be deep winter, I often think about lumber camps. The camps, which spread across the great forests of northern Minnesota, bustled during the coldest months.

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The early days of Mesabi Iron Range were rough and tumble. Men came first as traders, prospectors and lumberjacks. However, there were women who also came up to Northern Minnesota and they, too, worked at developing our Iron Range towns as more schools, libraries, churches and paved streets …

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The letter written by my uncle, which I shared with readers on this page last Sunday, got me thinking about “The Albany,” which is how people always referred to it while I was growing up. It seemed that besides my uncle, many other people we knew had connections to that mine or had lived in …

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Last Sunday on this page, the Armistice Day Blizzard of 1940 was remembered. Fifty-nine people would be killed in Minnesota because of the storm. Some were hunters who found themselves stuck in river marshes, unable to get to solid ground. Some were farmers who got lost in their pastures try…

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Winter storms are a part of life in Minnesota. We shovel out and move on to the next one. But there are some storms that are never forgotten. One such storm is the Armistice Day Blizzard of Nov. 11, 1940.

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Eighty years ago, Highland Park, also known as “Pill Hill,” was known as “The Dumps.” Two tiers of overburden, stacked one atop the other, formed this geological phenomenon. It gave birth to the “Little Speedway,” “Big Speedway” and the “Scaffle.”

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When you are next by the high school, take some time to visit the flagpole. It is an impressive 110 feet tall and may very well be the tallest flagpole in Minnesota. Flagpole painters have told Hibbing district superintendents over the years that they have never painted a taller flagpole.

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Huge, thick black capital letters stretched across the entire top of page one of the Hibbing Daily Tribune on Monday, Nov. 11, 1918. That big headline just had two words: WAR ENDS.

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I hope that you enjoyed last Sunday’s “Years of Yore” about the early years of the town of Kelly Lake. This week continues the story. Thanks again to the following sources that I used to write these articles:

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Joe and I are blessed to have many wonderful neighbors. One of them, Mike Nelson, said to me “You should do a story about my hometown, Kelly Lake!” So I began to gather articles and books about the town located between Keewatin and Hibbing.

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Last week’s “Years of Yore” was devoted to the early years of Hibbing medicine. To recap part of that article: with the move to the new town site in the early 1920s, a stately new hospital was built between Third and Fourth avenues bordered on the south by 21st Street. Originally named the R…

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It’s hard to imagine the early settlers coming into a wilderness with so few of the conveniences we now take for granted. It’s nice to learn that, although quite primitive by our standards, almost from the very beginning there were doctors, nurses, midwives, clinics and hospitals along the I…

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“Laughter is an instant vacation,” said American comedian and actor Milton Berle. I think we all could use a little vacation from the sadness and stress of the world.

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Reading the memoirs of people who grew up in mining locations on the Iron Range never gets old for me. I do hope that readers of this page enjoy those stories, too, as I have a couple more to share today.

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For the past two weeks, this page has been focused on celebrating the history of Hibbing’s libraries. This topic will wrap up today with a look at one very special aspect of the libraries: the Rosenkranz murals.

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Last week, here on the “Years of Yore” page, were stories about the history of Hibbing’s public libraries. Maybe you were surprised, as I was, to learn that the library to be built in the new town site had originally been envisioned on Howard Street.

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About 110 years ago, on Sept. 5, 1908, Chisholm was decimated by a forest fire that swept into the town destroying nearly all buildings and displacing 6,000 people. Driven by shifting winds, the fire moved with vicious speed.

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The following article appeared in the Hibbing Daily Tribune on July 16, 1910. The emergence of the new technology of the time, the telephone, was obviously catching on in the growing community of Hibbing, and across Northern Minnesota.

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To celebrate Hibbing’s 125th birthday, the Hibbing Historical Society devoted its most recent newsletter to celebrating several of the oldest businesses in town.

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On Wednesday, Aug. 8, a beautiful summer’s evening, on the front lawn of the Hibbing City Hall, about 150 people gathered to say “Happy 125th Birthday” to Hibbing.

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When Johann Heinrich Dietrich Hibbing was born in the small town of Kirchboitzen, in the Von Ahlen region of Germany, in 1855, no one could have guessed what all his future would hold. His mother died when he was still a child and at the age of 18 he decided to emigrate to America.

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Next month Hibbing will celebrate its 125th Birthday. It’s good at such a time to remember the challenges and achievements of those people who built our town … and then built it again

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America declared war on Germany on April 6, 1917, two and a half years after the First World War began raging in Europe. However, America had been supplying Great Britain and the other Allied powers with materials to fight the war throughout those years. The “breadbasket” of America supplied…

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While doing my research in the Hibbing Public Library these past few weeks, I have encountered many children who are excited about reading. I’m so glad to see them proudly carrying their books up to the desk and explaining to the librarians there why they liked a particular story.

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I often marvel at the early pioneers. Whether they crossed oceans or prairies, whether they forged along mountain passes or trekked through forests, I think about their determination and bravery.

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Some people say that the Fourth of July is their favorite holiday. Maybe that’s because it can be celebrated inside or outside, with all sorts of fun foods, upbeat music and lots of red, white and blue.

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“Sidewalk supervisors” have many places to exercise their skills this summer in Hibbing. It seems that every other street or avenue is getting some sort of facelift. Of course, the most obvious work being done is downtown with its new sidewalks and fresh curbs.

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The following article first appeared in the Hibbing Daily Tribune on Sunday, March 5, 2000, as part of a series the newspaper was running called “The Way We Look.” This article was written by Christina Hiatt who would, in 2000, marry her replacement as a Tribune reporter, Aaron Brown.

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This article first appeared in the Hibbing Daily Tribune on June 5, 1918. When the article refers to homes being built in Alice, that, of course, was the name of the location to which Hibbing was beginning to move.

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The photo on the cover of the Hibbing Daily Tribune this past Wednesday, June 12, 2018, is startling. Seeing the seats all removed from the Hibbing High School Auditorium may have sent a shiver up your spine. Be assured that the seats will be coming back, refurbished and in their correct places.

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Two hundred years ago, on April 4, 1818, Congress passed an act specifying that new flag designs should become official on the first July 4 (Independence Day) following admission of one or more new states.

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Jack Lynch may have been a curmudgeon to some. He was even a self-proclaimed curmudgeon. But my husband, Joe, and I rarely, if ever, saw that aspect of him.

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Graduation. No matter the level of education, no matter the school, graduation is a time of taking pride in reaching an achievement. Through the years in Hibbing’s schools, commencement has been celebrated with music, speeches, looking back and looking ahead. Here, from a variety of sources,…

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The first Saturday of May has long been known as Kentucky Derby Day. In Hibbing, however, the first Saturday of May has long been known for a different race. Actually, for many races and field events. Named for Francis “Doc” Savage, the Doc Savage Track Meet attracted a large number of schoo…

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An article headlined “Notes from the Hibbing Soldier” had items from Hibbing soldiers scattered from coast to coast.

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Fifty years ago Managing Editor Bert Ackerson took a stroll down Memory Curling Rink and wrote a retrospective about some of the men who nurtured the roarin’ game in Hibbing.

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