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With the new school year underway, it seems like a good time to remember other school years and the people and events from “back in the day.” Some things change, and some things remain the same.

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The cool mornings. A tree branch here and there turns red. Birds gather on the fence. We don’t need too many more signs to know that the seasons are changing.

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The following article is a selection of excerpts from the 1957 history, re-published in 1983, “Hibbing: The Man and the Village” written by Dr. Samuel Guello, with the assistance of Dr. Robert Koenig.

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On Wednesday, August 7, a breezy summer’s evening, on the front lawn of the Hibbing City Hall, over 200 people gathered to say “Happy 126th Birthday” to Hibbing. The event was organized by the Hibbing Historical Society and funded by the City of Hibbing. A decorated birthday cake from Sunris…

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Reading memoirs or well-written histories about a time long before one’s own is often startling. The reader wonders, “How did those people get through it?” or “Could I have done what they did?” Whether reading about rulers or everyday people, we discover the foibles, the strengths, the chall…

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Today, Sunday, July 28, 2019, Bishop Paul Sirba, ninth bishop of the Catholic diocese of Duluth, will be celebrating Mass at the Blessed Sacrament Side Lake Chapel. It is an annual summer event for the Bishop to visit the chapel.

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In the early days of many settlements in America, people needed to band together to merely survive. Whether it be learning about what food could be raised here, what sort of shelter was necessary, or how to stay healthy, the early settlers usually helped each other.

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It is clear, when paging through the newspapers of Hibbing’s past, that Hibbingites have always enjoyed stage entertainment. From the earliest years they eagerly supported live stage shows of all types. Also, several “movie palaces,” as even the plainest of buildings that showed movies was r…

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In 2007, Mary Lou Namanic published a scholarly non-fiction book about Fourth of July celebrations through the years on the Iron Range. The book, “One Day for Democracy – Independence Day and the Americanization of Iron Range Immigrants,” was published by Ohio University Press. Her research …

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When it comes to summer celebrations, Hibbing has put on some quite spectacular events over the years. Honoring Hibbing’s birthdays, or anniversaries as they are also called, these big parties came to be known as Jubilees. In 1953, in honor of the 60th Anniversary of Hibbing, a particularly …

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It’s that time of year again. “Summer?” you ask. Well, yes it IS summer and what every summer brings with it is reunions.

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Fascinating views are now available at the Windows to the World – the new mine view which recently opened in North Hibbing and is a “must-visit “ on everyone’s list for this summer. Visitors and local folks alike will find it a remarkable spot. Plan on spending time walking through the whole…

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“The years run too short and the days too fast.” This is a line from the beautiful 1978 song “Time Passages” by Scottish singer-songwriter Al Stewart. I think that the longer you live, the more you can identify with the idea he expressed in that line.

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This is Memorial Day Weekend. Along with the joy that summer is here at last, there is also the somber knowledge that Memorial Day is a time to remember those who have died preserving our freedoms.

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I was so lucky to work in downtown Hibbing in the 1970s. I was hired by the Teskes to work in their beautiful jewelry and gift store on the corner of Howard Street and 4th Avenue. I began working there at age 16 and continued through summers, school vacations, Saturdays, and when I left for …

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After the major construction period of the 1920s, during which time the “new Hibbing” was built, citizens here must have been glad to settle into their new homes (or their old homes moved to a new site), dig new gardens, and get used to new streets. New churches rose, a new hospital took sha…

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Despite the snow this week, we KNOW summer is coming! There are few places more beautiful than Northern Minnesota in the summer, notwithstanding the mosquitoes. Very soon the trees will be bright with leaves, the air will be soft with warm breezes, and the lakes—well, can anyone really descr…

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One hundred years ago, Hibbing’s citizens were facing a major change in their lives. The move of the town, so the ore beneath their feet could be extracted, was about to begin.

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North Hibbing was, by 1919, a beautiful town of nearly 18,000 people. It had a downtown lit by so many electric streetlights that it was called “The Great White Way”, the grand Lincoln High School with its indoor pool, graceful Carnegie Library, and some very impressive homes. It also had ma…

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Last week on this page the stories of some of the first white women to live on the Iron Range were shared with readers. More of these stories will be shared today. Based on the readers I heard from, this is a topic that many people found interesting.

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Moving to a new place can cause a mix of emotions. There’s excitement and happiness. There might also be worry and trepidation. The white settlers who came to northern Minnesota in the late 1800s and early 1900s probably had many such feelings.

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From the days when the “Seven Iron Men” – the Merritt brothers – first used hand shovels to find rich iron on the Mesabi, to today’s enormous taconite plants, the people of the Iron Range have watched things change. Whether it’s their towns moving, their roads being re-routed, or the equipme…

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Exciting changes were coming to Kitzville in 1919! At long last, twelve years since it was platted, the little village would have a water system.

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I am the granddaughter of four Slovenian immigrants. Each came from a different village in Slovenia, met each other here in America, and married. One by one, in the years that followed, they became American citizens. I know that many of you reading this can tell a similar story about your an…

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100 years ago, the town of Hibbing was located about two miles north of where it is today. Growing up with the story of “the town that moved,” and often seeing photos of houses and other buildings up on wheels and being pulled to a new place, I think I took the whole story of the move very m…

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Yes, we are getting a lot of snow these first months of 2019! But here in the “Bold North” we can handle it. We’ve been coping with snow for a long time, and often with the tradition of a blizzard during tournament time

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By the time the First World War ended in 1918, the iron ore mines of northeastern Minnesota were extremely busy places. Steel, in demand during wartime, was now in even greater demand in peacetime. This demand, of course, is why the town of Hibbing was to become “the town that moved”.

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“Us, On a Greyhound Bus” is the wonderful title to a song native Hibbingite Don Peterson wrote for the 1968 re-staging of his musical about Hibbing and the Iron Range, Growin’ Pains. That 1968 production was one element of Hibbing’s Diamond Jubilee 75th Birthday Celebration. I was young, but…

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The sport of curling, well-known to most in our area even if one has never yelled “Sweep!”, captured the world’s attention during the Olympic Winter Games in February 2014. Curling clubs in such unlikely places as Palm Beach, Florida, and Bakersfield, California, have organized in the past c…

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It is Presidents Day weekend, a time to honor America’s presidents. Since four presidents were born in this month, George Washington, William Harrison, Abraham Lincoln, and Ronald Reagan, it seems like a good time to celebrate presidents.

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Last week, this page presented Part 1 of Alice Killorin’s story about growing up in Hibbing at the beginning of the 20th Century. She first wrote the story for a 1983 Hibbing Daily Tribune special publication celebrating the town’s 90th Anniversary.

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The early pioneers of the Iron Range’s first towns did not have it easy. They needed to be young, healthy and strong, I think, to deal with the challenges of everyday life in those years. I’m always glad to find stories from those folks. The images in their stories remind us to be thankful f…

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A couple of weeks ago, this page told the story of the history of the DuPont Company in Hibbing. It seemed to get people’s interest and a few folks asked for more stories about underground mining and blasting.

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Hibbing has a long history of recreational opportunities. Looking into files at the Historical Society or reading through old newspapers, it’s easy to find information about all sorts of pastimes Hibbingites enjoyed. Whether it was community theatre or basketball leagues or H.A.M. radio club…

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If you have gone past or into the Memorial Building during the past several months, you have seen evidence of the upgrades happening there. This fine Art Deco-style building always receives compliments from visitors. Peter Hyduke, Director of City Services, and the entire staff of the Memori…

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When people enjoy Carey Lake — the cross country skiing in winter, or the fishing and swimming in the summer — they might not know the interesting history there. Maybe they hear some people refer to the area as “DuPont” and not know why. There might even be an old-timer who mentions that the…

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It’s always a joy to find stories written by people about everyday events. That’s not to say that stories about big, once-in-a-lifetime events such as landing on the moon or winning an election aren’t terrific too, but there is something about ordinary people’s lives that inspires.

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Here are a number of articles that appeared in the Hibbing Daily Tribune over a variety of years. How people celebrated the holidays in past years is interesting to read about. Some things change and some things remain the same.

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When it gets to be deep winter, I often think about lumber camps. The camps, which spread across the great forests of northern Minnesota, bustled during the coldest months.

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The early days of Mesabi Iron Range were rough and tumble. Men came first as traders, prospectors and lumberjacks. However, there were women who also came up to Northern Minnesota and they, too, worked at developing our Iron Range towns as more schools, libraries, churches and paved streets …

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The letter written by my uncle, which I shared with readers on this page last Sunday, got me thinking about “The Albany,” which is how people always referred to it while I was growing up. It seemed that besides my uncle, many other people we knew had connections to that mine or had lived in …

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Last Sunday on this page, the Armistice Day Blizzard of 1940 was remembered. Fifty-nine people would be killed in Minnesota because of the storm. Some were hunters who found themselves stuck in river marshes, unable to get to solid ground. Some were farmers who got lost in their pastures try…

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Winter storms are a part of life in Minnesota. We shovel out and move on to the next one. But there are some storms that are never forgotten. One such storm is the Armistice Day Blizzard of Nov. 11, 1940.

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Eighty years ago, Highland Park, also known as “Pill Hill,” was known as “The Dumps.” Two tiers of overburden, stacked one atop the other, formed this geological phenomenon. It gave birth to the “Little Speedway,” “Big Speedway” and the “Scaffle.”

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When you are next by the high school, take some time to visit the flagpole. It is an impressive 110 feet tall and may very well be the tallest flagpole in Minnesota. Flagpole painters have told Hibbing district superintendents over the years that they have never painted a taller flagpole.

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Huge, thick black capital letters stretched across the entire top of page one of the Hibbing Daily Tribune on Monday, Nov. 11, 1918. That big headline just had two words: WAR ENDS.

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I hope that you enjoyed last Sunday’s “Years of Yore” about the early years of the town of Kelly Lake. This week continues the story. Thanks again to the following sources that I used to write these articles:

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Joe and I are blessed to have many wonderful neighbors. One of them, Mike Nelson, said to me “You should do a story about my hometown, Kelly Lake!” So I began to gather articles and books about the town located between Keewatin and Hibbing.

We're always interested in hearing about news in our community. Let us know what's going on!